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Sympathetic finger movement under stress

By June 23, 2017News

Attend any class at Texas Pistol & Rifle Academy and you will hear the “Jump Tower” story. Not to give it away, but the story illustrates how the body’s will for self-preservation can hijack rational thought and interrupt even the simplest of commands for action. The takeaway is this, every human being is born with a will towards self-preservation that pervades all action. Under stress, your will towards self-preservation manifests itself as a buck, jerk, or slap of the trigger because although you believe your mind is focused on the shot, your body is actually focused on the blast that will soon come from the muzzle. Children don’t have to be taught to startle at a thunderclap – but the adult can be taught to use their natural tendencies to get the shot they want.

Stress can steal your shot

A bad trigger press can ruin a perfect shot setup. Whether you are shooting a pistol, M4 carbine, shotgun, or bolt rifle, pressing the trigger poorly will move the sights, and you will miss the shot. Under stress, your body’s application of pressure to the trigger is in “overdrive” because of adrenaline – recruiting more muscles to the task. When pulling the trigger, sympathetic finger movement will hijack your trigger pull by recruiting the remaining fingers in the hand creating a full handed clutching or squeezing. In the example of the pistol, a right-handed shooter will hit low and left of the point of aim, and a left-handed shooter will hit low-right. At TPA you will learn a firing stroke that works through your sympathetic finger movement to deliver a point of aim, point of impact shot on target every time you pull the trigger. Learn to overcome sympathetic finger movement to get point of aim, point of impact hits every time you decide to pull the trigger – train at TPA today!